Saturday, 23 November 2019

A Dog's Life: Inside or Outside is the Question

We have a beautiful mixed breed dog we rescued from an animal shelter about four years ago, who perhaps ironically, rescued us as much as we rescued her. At 56-kilos (123-pounds), she's no little girl, and probably could stand to lose some weight, as I previously blogged about here.

She's a bit of a sap, but she's our sap, and we love her. One thing she's not is an outdoor dog. Yes, she loves going for walks, but she also gets exercise on a treadmill for about 30-minutes each morning before her breakfast. Like all dogs, the backyard is her outhouse, though I am convinced that if she could figure out how, she opt for using the same toilet we do.

Our fur baby is not overly sociable with strangers and doesn't play well with other dogs, but then again, my wife often jokes that I'm not overly sociable either. I guess we're made for each other. Wherever we are, she wants to be as well, and she adores our grand babies and protects them like they were her own pups. For that we are blessed.

However, I have a confession to make; things were not always like that.

Growing up we had dogs, but they were never allowed in the house, with the exception of extremely cold nights, and even then, only in the basement. As I grew older and got married, we again had dogs, but I am sorry to say that they spent too much time outside and away from the family. In retrospect, my wife and I both still feel horrible about that; the dogs just wanted to be a part of the family, and we by our actions, essentially denied them that. How sad! We really should never have had them, and after the last dog passed away, we went several years dog-less. Maybe we needed that break to learn how to become real dog lovers and appreciate them as much as they appreciate us.

Thankfully things are very different with our current dog. I couldn't imagine her not being in our home and in our lives, even with having to vacuum up enough dog hair every week to knit another dog. She is a part of the family and we are committed to giving her the best home possible.

Our house is her dog house.

Recently I discovered a video by Dr. Ernie Ward, a veterinarian, who did a little experiment to learn what it must be like for a dog to live outdoors in a dog house during winter. As I suggested above, we have come to believe that if you're going to have a dog that only lives outside, you probably shouldn't have one at all. I will now never be convinced otherwise. However, as Dr. Ward's experiment shows, especially don't leave them outside in cold sub-freezing weather … please.



I also like how Dr. Ward briefly makes reference to homelessness among humans, another deplorable problem in society. Certainly much more can and needs to be said and done about our inhumanity toward our fellow man in even allowing it, but that's a separate topic for another day.

Just my humble opinion. Peace.

"The world would be a nicer place if everyone 
had the ability to love as unconditionally as a dog."
M.K. Clinton

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